Orthogenetic Surgery

Introduction

Orthognathic Surgery (Corrective Jaw Surgery) involves moving the bones of the upper or lower jaw or both. The jaws are lengthened or shortened, moved up or down, in or out, resulting in a more harmonious bite and facial appearance.Orthognathic surgery is needed when jaws and teeth don’t meet correctly. Repositioning the jaws so that the teeth meet (occlude) correctly improves jaw joint function and chewing (mastication) ability, and can also improve speech, breathing, sleep apnea, periodontal (gum) health and facial aesthetics.

Orthognathic Surgery (Corrective Jaw Surgery) is a complex surgery and because of the intricacies of occlusion (the way the teeth bite) and the combined effect on the facial appearance when moving the teeth and jaws, orthognathic surgery must be carefully planned. Because of its complexity, a team approach is used.

Procedure

During an orthognathic surgery to correct an open bite, the orthognathic surgery performed will always be bimaxillary, to correctly position both the mandibular and the maxillary arch, usually by making rotational and orbital movements. Some of the bone in the upper tooth bearing portion of the jaw is removed. The upper jaw is then secured in position with plates and screws. The goal or orthognathic surgery is to address both aesthetic and functional issues caused by the misalignment of the jaw.

Recovery

Initial jaw healing typically takes about six weeks after surgery, but complete healing can take up to 12 weeks. After initial jaw healing at about six weeks your orthodontist finishes aligning your teeth with braces. The entire orthodontic process, including surgery and braces, may take several years. Once the braces are removed, retainers to hold tooth position may be used.